1. avatar fletch_belfast
    Is there even a difference? I don't want a super expensive one, but I obviously want the best quality signal possible for the least money. And particular brand or type to look for?

    Also, will the length of the cable impair my signal in any way? Like, if I want a 10 metre cable, incase I want to go to a practice room or anything, but generally I sit here and record and I'm only 1 metre away from my UX2, will the extra 9 metres of cable curled up on the floor increase the 'latency' (if that's the right word) because of the extra distance the signal must travel...?
  2. avatar papaul
    [quote:06b6ea0c00="fletch_belfast"]Is there even a difference? I don't want a super expensive one, but I obviously want the best quality signal possible for the least money. And particular brand or type to look for?

    Also, will the length of the cable impair my signal in any way? Like, if I want a 10 metre cable, incase I want to go to a practice room or anything, but generally I sit here and record and I'm only 1 metre away from my UX2, will the extra 9 metres of cable curled up on the floor increase the 'latency' (if that's the right word) because of the extra distance the signal must travel...?[/quote:06b6ea0c00]

    Theres a massive difference between the really cheap ones and the quality ones, but the quality ones are basically all the same. A 10 meter cable isn't going affect the quality of your tone if it's good quality cable, you definitely won't have latency problems. Go for planet waves cables, Matchetts sell them, great quality.
  3. avatar tinpot anto
    Viper is a good brand too, and the fabric covered Stagg ones that Matchett's stock are really good value

    Just be careful with the Planet Waves as the wee springy yokes they have on some cables can pop the wee rings out of some jack sockets fairly easily, particularly on Fender amps, very good to have the extra purchase between guitar and first pedal though.
  4. avatar fletch_belfast
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Venom-Viper-20ft-Guitar-PRO-Cable-Lead-BEST-DEAL-/360247637177?cmd=ViewItem&pt=UK_Guitar_Accessories&hash=item53e06eb4b9

    One of these..?
  5. avatar Recycled Alien
    I accidentally ended up with somebody else's 3m Planet Waves lead after a gig, and it was the worst piece of junk -- more microphonic than a microphone. If you gave it a flick to get the loops moving on the floor, that was totally audible as a rattle through the amp. As a service to musicians I put it in the bin.

    I use a mixture of the coloured Cordial leads from Thomann and Fender vintage cloth-covered ones (which aren't particularly expensive). I like having distinctive leads for identification on a crowded stage, and I'm happy with both types.

    In answer to part of the original question, "latency" isn't ever a problem because the signals travel at the speed of light, so there's only nanosecond differences. And guitar pickup signals are high (compared to microphone levels) meaning that additional interference from a longer cable will be undetectable, provided the lead is of reasonable quality.
  6. avatar danbmc
    I would also suggest you stay away from the Planet Waves cables - They are really overpriced, and the cheaper moulded jack ones are pure rubbish, I have went through a number of them and have never been happy.

    You're far better off buying a decent quality cable once, rather than lots of crap ones over the years! Klotz make good quality cable as an example, and you can get them with Neutrik Jack plugs which are great quality. As for the length, if you are really only using it for plugging into your computer, the shorter the better. Although it doesn't make a [i:f073438346]massive[/i:f073438346]difference, the signal does degrade as it travels down the cable. 3 metres should be plenty!
  7. avatar flightstrip
    i second thomanns,but only if ur ordering a fair bit of stuff as u have to spend a fair oul whack before u get free postage.i think leads,strings and other consumables are way too expensive in norn iron.check em out www.thomann.de
  8. avatar fletch_belfast
    mmkay, I looked at everything on Nevadamusic between a fiver and 50 quid, and they all seem more or less the same to me. Everybody has 'oxygen-free-copper' and 'double-shielding' pretty much, but this Vox one also has 24k gold plated connectors (instead of just gold-tipped), and also I think it looks pretty 'cool', so I shall probably buy that one.

    http://www.nevadamusic.co.uk/Guitars/Guitar-Accessories/Guitar-Leads-and-Pickups/sc1620/p8037.aspx#relatedProducts
  9. avatar Recycled Alien
    My Physics degree included a lot of work on the quantum behaviour of electrons in solids. I can assure you that "oxygen-free copper" offers [b:e41171ae13]zero[/b:e41171ae13] benefit for music instrument signals. (And less for speaker cables. :D )
  10. avatar chrisjedijane
    Gold-plated connectors don't matter when the rest of the connector is made of another metal.

    I've been using the medium-priced (£20-ish) Planet Waves cables for years without any problems. Wrap it up correctly at the end of every show and you'll be fine.

    They don't put compression springs on the Planet Waves cables anymore as they tended to chew up cheaper plastic jacks and get stuck.
  11. avatar Rock Danger
    Just get some van damme cable and a couple of neutrik jacks, add solder, job done. Planet waves break more than the cheapie ones.
  12. avatar my-angel-rocks
    I also have had no problems with Planet Waves - so long as you wrap them correctly they'll last.
    The bassist from Black Bear Saloon has a massive cable (I've tried, I can't make this sentence not sound like an innuendo, sorry), it must be about a centimetre in diameter.
  13. avatar sloppyjoe
    The first thing I'd look for is genuine Neutrik plugs on a decent looking cable, because quality components and quality construction tend to go together. If it's Neutrik-style copies you've probably got a dodgy job all around. Made in China by an 8-year old.

    As for the other stuff, latency isn't a consideration over the length of a guitar cable. Degradation can happen over extreme runs or with really shitty cable, but the main issue is that the cable itself has a capacitance that can combine with the amp's input impedance to act as a filter. That affects which frequencies get through from guitar to amp, which in turn shapes your guitar tone. There's a short article about that in [url=http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/nov09/articles/guitarcables.htm]Sound on Sound[/url] if you're interested. Of course, if you're playing into a POD or similar, it's probably not something you want to fret over at all. Cable capacitance is a consuming interest for tone purists and amp geeks, but nobody else really needs to give a rat's ass. Buy a decent lead and get back to your playing.
  14. avatar salfhal
    [quote:8627bd5333="sloppyjoe"]The first thing I'd look for is genuine Neutrik plugs on a decent looking cable, because quality components and quality construction tend to go together. If it's Neutrik-style copies you've probably got a dodgy job all around. Made in China by an 8-year old.

    As for the other stuff, latency isn't a consideration over the length of a guitar cable. Degradation can happen over extreme runs or with really shitty cable, but the main issue is that the cable itself has a capacitance that can combine with the amp's input impedance to act as a filter. That affects which frequencies get through from guitar to amp, which in turn shapes your guitar tone. There's a short article about that in [url=http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/nov09/articles/guitarcables.htm]Sound on Sound[/url] if you're interested. Of course, if you're playing into a POD or similar, it's probably not something you want to fret over at all. Cable capacitance is a consuming interest for tone purists and amp geeks, but nobody else really needs to give a rat's ass. Buy a decent lead and get back to your playing.[/quote:8627bd5333]

    NEUTRIK - NYS224S - Country of Origin: CN China
  15. avatar SimonC
    Planet Waves IIRC have a lifetime warranty - so send them back if they break/crack whatever ... I've done it twice and got new leads from them.
  16. avatar sloppyjoe
    [quote:86a3bbbcab="salfhal"][quote:86a3bbbcab="sloppyjoe"]If it's Neutrik-style copies you've probably got a dodgy job all around. Made in China by an 8-year old.
    [/quote:86a3bbbcab]

    NEUTRIK - NYS224S - Country of Origin: CN China[/quote:86a3bbbcab]

    Guess that makes me a pseudy twat then.
  17. avatar Recycled Alien
    I've soldered a good many jack plugs in my time, and I don't think Neutrik are any better than any other die-cast type anyway. The solder tags are just as flimsy as any, and the plastic end isn't long enough or springy enough to provide strain relief. (I usually add a bit of heatshrink sleeve over the joint.)

    Picking up the issue of gold plating: the point of it is that gold doesn't corrode, so you should always have a good metal-to-metal contact when you plug in. But chrome plating doesn't corrode either, and that's what you get on all other plugs. Gold is definitely an advantage on electronics connectors, like PC RAM, because the alternative is copper tracks or solder pads, both of which grow insulating oxide coatings. But for jack plugs, I don't think so.

    Oh, and it's definitely plectrums, not fingers.
  18. avatar tinpot anto
    Also gold, being soft rubs off fairly quickly with use anyway - rarely lasts more than a few months, so another reason why it's a waste of time.
  19. avatar fletch_belfast
    I'm not sure if I am more confused than when I started this, or are we coming to the conclusion that it doesn't matter a fuck and a £5 lead will do..? So many questions.

    But about the oxygen free copper thing, why are they shouting about it as a selling point of these products if, as you say, it isn't relevant? Good old fashioned misinformation/false advertising of sorts?
  20. avatar Recycled Alien
    I think the oxygen-free idea is a bit of leakage from the world of "audiophile" products, where people are astonishingly gullible about buying useless stuff that is supposed to improve the sound of their expensive systems.

    There was one that was a "special" green felt-tip pen for drawing round the edges of your CDs to stop the laser light leaking out, and my absolute favourite, a replacement wooden volume knob for your amp:

    [i:3ba0536997]with ordinary knobs "the micro vibrations created by the volume pots and knobs find their way into the delicate signal path and cause degradation". But: "With the signature knobs, micro vibrations from the C37 concept of wood, bronze and the lacquer itself compensate...and provide...way better sound!"[/i:3ba0536997]

    It was only $485 plus shipping too, but sadly is now unavailable.
  21. avatar my-angel-rocks
    [quote:90a08ccac0="Recycled Alien"]and my absolute favourite[/quote:90a08ccac0]

    There was a speaker cable at £3000 a metre, or a pair of interconnects for £5000
    The "cable" was 5 copper wires, with another copper wire wrapped around each of them, then each was encased in clear plastic sheath. Apparently each wire was created by heating the wire up to just before melting point then immediately submersing it in liquid nitrogen, which meant the molecules would be in perfect alignment.
  22. avatar tinpot anto
    Dare I suggest robustness trumps "performance" yet again?

    :-)

    pay good money for a good lead from guitar to pedal 1, which will get most abuse, for the rest, standard makes will do and a few spares.
  23. avatar DontPetABurningDog
    I prefer curly leads, especially with single-coil guitars. They roll off the high end just a tiny wee bit.
  24. avatar Leif Bodnarchuk
    Van Damme, Proel, Canare are all fine. (Been using Canare GS-6 for a while now, no problems.)

    If you use really high gain, distortion etc, it's pretty hard to completely eliminate ALL cable crackle. Virtually everything in a high-gain-chain is microphonic to a degree. Obviously, there ARE differences, and quality can be decided by the human ear.

    You wanna look out for quality of screening and signal wire. Thicker is better to a degree. (Canare GS-6 is great cable)
    And be careful of the semi-conductive (if that's applicable) extra rubber shield. If that comes in contact with the signal, all the high frequencies are shunted and your guitar sounds like crap.

    10 metres is awfully long if it's from the guitar to the first 'thing'. You CAN hear a difference. You can get away with 10 metres after a pedal (buffering, impedance, yadda yadda.) but really, it's a good idea to keep cable as short as can be. You don't have to be anal, just sensible.

    Neutrik are ok, Switchcraft are the bizz-nizz.
  25. avatar theouroboros
    can i add to this thread by asking who uses which patch cables for effects and what anyone would recommend?
  26. avatar SimonC
    George L's all the way for patch cables.
  27. avatar rahamilton
    A shielded guitar cable is basically a capacitor - ie two conductors seperated by a dialectric (Rubber, nylon, oxygen free air - whatever...). Therefore the longer it is, the more capacitance, and the more treble you lose. Try to stay under five metres if you can. I have had great success with the leads from Award Session in England. Every possible permutation of Neutric connector (including silent switching)on the end of Van Damme cable, and all at a good price. The only thing to get 100% in a Guitar and Bass Magazine review. I've never been impressed by Planet waves.

    Tony
  28. avatar bigguskeefus
    I use Elixir cables they are expensive but they make a hell of a difference. i dont see the point in having a top quality guitar and distorting the signal between the guitar and amp with an inferior quality cable. the Planet Waves cables are very good too but if i were you if you can afford an Elixir or two the go for it. they are about £30 each but its down to how serious you are about your tone mate.

    Good Hunting and God bless

    Keith
  29. avatar Recycled Alien
    [quote:510c19921d="bigguskeefus"] they are about £30 each but its down to how serious you are about your tone mate.[/quote:510c19921d]I have this green felt tip you might be interested in. Only £20.
  30. avatar fletch_belfast
    Due to a delay with my order, they are throwing in that Vox cable I posted the link to for free, so it's all good. :109:
  31. avatar Leif Bodnarchuk
    [quote:43aaa2c5db="bigguskeefus"]i dont see the point in having a top quality guitar and distorting the signal between the guitar and amp with an inferior quality cable.[/quote:43aaa2c5db]

    Ha ha, i've never heard anyone use that; that's perfect. So true.

    Guitar - £600
    Pedals - £300
    Amp - £500
    Cables - Fiver?
    :lol:
  32. avatar Hirishnu
    If you are just playing at home why go to all this bother and listen to 3 pages of crap?...go out buy a lead and play if you take care of it it should last quite some time dont buy the cheapest dont buy the most expensive pick one that you can afford and look after it. Most importantly PLAY im sure your guitar or bass cost more than a lead and havin it sittn in the corner gathering dust is pointless!:)

    I have planet waves have had the same ones for years gig extensivly and have never once had a problem with them and they do have a lifetime warranty so if anything does happen i get a new one for free!
  33. avatar Leif Bodnarchuk
    i worked with a guitarist who said this once...

    "when i'm on stage in front of thousands of people and i'm in the middle of a song and the guitar cuts out... what's that worth? Ten bucks? Twenty bucks?"

    If you're playing live, buy quality, make sure you have spares, and as has been said, take care of ALL your equipment.

    There's a TON of shitty, hocus pocus, voodoo, cork-sniffing products out there - so sometimes it's actually WORTH sifting through three pages of info to get to the point.