1. avatar Deadlights
    Are press packs important when sending EP's into record companies, media, promoters, etc?
  2. avatar comprachio
    I wouldn't include one.

    A small blurb written on a sticker and stuck to the CD cover is enough. Concise bio with clear contact details - phone, email, myspace/website. Here's an example;

    [img:4d301ed957]http://www.worldinmotion.net/theothertwo/discography/singles/1999/SuperHighwaysPromoStickerCDUK.jpg[/img:4d301ed957]

    Reams of paper are not welcomed by most labels/radio stations/promoters these days. It also means there's less chance of them misplacing contact info.

    I would also present each song title with information on swearing and time - a common courtesy when sending to radio. eg.
    "1. Queen - Bohemian Rhapsody (Clean) - 5.56"
    Last edited on , 2 times in total.
  3. avatar JTM
    Couldn't have put it better, well done that man.
  4. avatar exitonline
    As above but for labels and management a full press pack is essential. Also, dont forget to put your full contact information on everything so if anything gets misplaced/separated they can still identify you. i.e. full name address on CD and CD cover etc.

    Photographs are essential for labels, as the music business these days has a heavy reliance on image. Especially in the pop markets.
  5. avatar jenniemcc
    I don't want photos sent to me please. I have a hilarious collection of some really truely awful ones I've been sent in the past.

    I'd rather get a promo in plastic wallet & sticker and a link to website where I could see photos, if I so wanted.

    Save paper all the way.

    Big fancy glossy press packs do nothing except waste money. If the music's good, it's good. It's it's shit, it's shit. Nothing's gonna change that.
  6. avatar SweetDickWilly
    Don't forget about cocaine!
  7. avatar comprachio
    [quote:c0750bd3bf]As above but for labels and management a full press pack is essential. [/quote:c0750bd3bf]

    No its not. This is a fallacy from a time where up to date info on unsigned bands wasn't available online. In fact many labels have either a policy of only accepting e-submissions or solicited CDs. If they don't like your songs then no amount of paper and photographs that you send will persuade them otherwise. If they do like your music then they'll look you up online and or request more info by email.

    Also, zany stunts generally don't work. Good songs, neatly presented do.
  8. avatar DeliriumTremens
    [quote:d9ccb627f5="SweetDickWilly"]Don't forget about cocaine![/quote:d9ccb627f5]

    And some haribo
  9. avatar T Entertainment
    Unless you've been asked for one, sending unsolicited recordings to record companies/pro management companies/agents is a complete waste of time, and any accompanying literature or pictures a complete waste of trees.
  10. avatar exitonline
    [quote:e0c867ddd0="comprachio"][quote:e0c867ddd0]As above but for labels and management a full press pack is essential. [/quote:e0c867ddd0]

    No its not. This is a fallacy from a time where up to date info on unsigned bands wasn't available online. In fact many labels have either a policy of only accepting e-submissions or solicited CDs. If they don't like your songs then no amount of paper and photographs that you send will persuade them otherwise. If they do like your music then they'll look you up online and or request more info by email.

    Also, zany stunts generally don't work. Good songs, neatly presented do.[/quote:e0c867ddd0]

    I was only speaking from our experience with labels etc. I do agree with the above, sending random demo/press packs to labels etc is a complete waste of time. Besides the fact that most of the bigger labels don't even accept unsolicited demos. We are currently dealing with a big management company and when we first got involved with them they specifically asked that we provide photographs etc as a full package. I ended up sending 3 photos (print & Digital), a DVD containing a music Video, a full bio pack containing all info, reviews etc. All of this was after I had made initial contact by phone and then sent them a CD. Most people want all the information to hand without having to go through all the hassle of looking you up. But you could always make contact with whoever you plan to send the stuff to in advance and ask them what exactly they need.

    Obviously promoters, radio, press etc dont really need a full blown package.