1. avatar palrub
    Lily Allen's new tune Who'd Have Known is a blatant rip off of Take That's Shine. Allegedly she's admitted to it, regardless.

    Got me to thinking, has this happened to you locally or have you recognised your stuff used elseplace? I think we all cringe when we hear motifs of our hard graft recorded 3 years previous popping up in international recent hits by chance. I still maintain i penned Harry Nilsson's Jump into the Fire having never heard it before in my life.. and Take That are still brilliant.
  2. avatar niallgraham
    Listen to that chorus! Exactly the same. :D

    But I know what you're saying. I'm tired of all these big artists ripping me off. I mean, come on. They might give some shoddy excuse like "...rock and pop music is incredibly simple and formulaic, and everything has been done, so no one can create anything truely origional. Plus, your band and my band have similar influences, so you might hear similarties between us from time to time. Plus, the human brain is evolved to notice patterns and sequences, even when there are none. There's NO WAY I could sneak into your bedroom when you're fast asleep and steal your music, or go onto your myspace, while I'm induldging in my daily hobby of searching out bands from northern ireland to rip off, and found a track I'd like to steal."

    Yeah right...I know the truth.
  3. avatar electriccircus
    who cares...
  4. avatar Hors D'oeuvres
    I find the idea of ownership in music and particular musical events being "your stuff" (or anyone else's "stuff" for that matter) a bit delusional. Who is to say that what you play/record/otherwise realise belongs to you? The concept of copyright and private ownership in supposedly "creative" areas of life seems like a painfully hilarious fallacy, to me....it's a pity so many people blindly believe in it without giving thought to the basic premises of what it argues for.

    I'd say you don't own anything, neither do I, nor does anyone else.
  5. avatar Recycled Alien
    [quote:bee6cf1e07="Hors D'oeuvres"]I find the idea of ownership in music and particular musical events being "your stuff" (or anyone else's "stuff" for that matter) a bit delusional. Who is to say that what you play/record/otherwise realise belongs to you? The concept of copyright and private ownership in supposedly "creative" areas of life seems like a painfully hilarious fallacy, to me....it's a pity so many people blindly believe in it without giving thought to the basic premises of what it argues for.

    I'd say you don't own anything, neither do I, nor does anyone else.[/quote:bee6cf1e07]I see where you're coming from. You believe that what you create is of no value, therefore any idea of ownership is redundant.
  6. avatar Chi-Lite
    Ooooh, so value neccessitates ownership now does it?

    don't talk balls.
  7. avatar Deadlights
    Yeah I hate it when that happens.

    Some boyo from Bangor stole my song Run and made a mint from it :P
  8. avatar Hors D'oeuvres
    [quote:c3ce949a57="Recycled Alien"][quote:c3ce949a57="Hors D'oeuvres"]I find the idea of ownership in music and particular musical events being "your stuff" (or anyone else's "stuff" for that matter) a bit delusional. Who is to say that what you play/record/otherwise realise belongs to you? The concept of copyright and private ownership in supposedly "creative" areas of life seems like a painfully hilarious fallacy, to me....it's a pity so many people blindly believe in it without giving thought to the basic premises of what it argues for.

    I'd say you don't own anything, neither do I, nor does anyone else.[/quote:c3ce949a57]I see where you're coming from. You believe that what you create is of no value, therefore any idea of ownership is redundant.[/quote:c3ce949a57]

    Not true....I'd say it is interesting to suppose that what I/we/people create/what is created is of no value that can be represented by infantile concepts such as "money" or "private ownership". It still holds personal value, and "music" may also hold great social/spiritual value (eg gamelan, folk traditions in their natural forms, protest music). I think that the prevailing concept of ownership suffers greatly from an overinflated sense of "pride" and a state of unfortunate insecurity, stemming from a desire to "feel secure".

    I've heard well known Irish Trad players say that they've sat in sessions listening to people play tunes originally "composed" by them, without knowing where they came from. The "composer"'s response to this was positive and he kept quiet, knowing the enjoyment that others were getting out of playing music together. I'd wager that most people involved in the popular music scene, were they in a similar position, would have to ejaculate the fact that the song was "theirs" all over the people enjoying it, because they're insecure enough to need social appreciation of "their talents" or something along those lines. A bit of a generalization but I think it's warranted....it's a good thing to discuss...
  9. avatar Clements
    Interesting discussion... That being said, if that dude actually did write "Run" then I think he is intitled to complain a bit. I must say, he's putting on a very brave face! Pop music is often written, and designed to sell a branded product (the artist) rather than to express, or say anything heartfelt, original or important. That being said, is there anything wrong with an artist being paid for their work? The idea that someone else is just as entitled to be paid for your work as you are... well, that way madness lies. If they are being paid to perform, no worries, they have performed, you have not. If they are being paid as though they were performing their own material, then there is surely an issue.
  10. avatar The enfant terrible
    I've occasionally suggested the odd lyric to someone in a band and it's cool as fuck if you hear a line you came up with being sung down the pub but fucksake like, buy us a beer for fucksake.

    In truth I wrote the lyrics to run on the back of a ripped up fagbox and left it lying at my hole in Wolsey's one night, skanky fucker knows the truth.
  11. avatar atomike
    here's a really good one to check out... Remember The Raconteurs song 'Steady as she goes', you know the one with the really catchy intro? Sounds uncannily similar to Joe Jackson's 'is she really going out with him' written in the late 70's. Take a listen!
    [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7aOWIFgIZQ][/url] (raconteurs)
    [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SPogGqCgeM][/url] (Joe Jackson- with great intro from Jimmy Saville, the "inventor" of cutting & mixing)
  12. avatar rentaghost
    youse do know that Lily Allen and Take That performed together live recently - interweaving both songs? It was great, and they all seemed happy enough, although they changed the key on Allen and it was a bit low for her.
  13. avatar Furious Tradesmen
    [quote:011cc27518]Pop music is often written, and designed to sell a branded product (the artist) rather than to express, or say anything heartfelt, original or important.[/quote:011cc27518]

    See that sentence? That's the most depressing thing I've read all day, and I'm reading a book about murder.
  14. avatar InnerCitiesClaud
    [quote:08c7d69f45="Furious Tradesmen"][quote:08c7d69f45]Pop music is often written, and designed to sell a branded product (the artist) rather than to express, or say anything heartfelt, original or important.[/quote:08c7d69f45]

    See that sentence? That's the most depressing thing I've read all day, and I'm reading a book about murder.[/quote:08c7d69f45]


    +1




    p.s I know there's a '+1' button but no-one ever notices it.
  15. avatar Furious Tradesmen
    not saying it isnt true, like.
    also, see the raconteurs? i saw them covering floating by jape. jape is the bassist in the redneck manifesto. that was weird and all.
  16. avatar superfreakz
    I would be very suprised if lily Allen didn't have to get clearance from take that to use that. After all the killers had to get Beethovens ode to joy cleared before they could release mr brightside
  17. avatar thecomeons_2
    i did intentionally use the music of the verse from "down in the street" as a bridge to a song i wrote twenty years ago. anything else was unintentional, and my influences just being worn on the sleeve.
  18. avatar Silversun
    [quote:cf33213d85="Furious Tradesmen"][quote:cf33213d85]Pop music is often written, and designed to sell a branded product (the artist) rather than to express, or say anything heartfelt, original or important.[/quote:cf33213d85]

    See that sentence? That's the most depressing thing I've read all day, and I'm reading a book about murder.[/quote:cf33213d85]

    Aye, depressingly true.

    Alas poor popular music, farewell, we barely knew you.
  19. avatar artyfufkin
    [quote:c58bd6d165="superfreakz"]I would be very suprised if lily Allen didn't have to get clearance from take that to use that. After all the killers had to get Beethovens ode to joy cleared before they could release mr brightside[/quote:c58bd6d165]

    Why? Mr Brightside sounds infantile compared to Beethoven's 9th, I'm hearing no resemblance. Am I missing something here? Besides, why would you need 'clearance' to use a piece of music that is almost 200 years old and therefore not governed by copyright laws and restrictions.