1. avatar reilly
    Hey guys/girls,

    Anybody going up to queens (or hoping to giving the right grades), to study music technology this september??

    Also, anybody currently doing the course, can ya provide any useful feedback? Would be nice to know from a student's POV what the course is actually like.

    Cheers!
  2. avatar adamthecat
    yeah, im seriously considering it, not fussed on the programming aspect though- looks tricky?
  3. avatar Tele
    Well, I lived with a guy who came from a Higher National Diploma in Music Production and he was doing it. My impression was that it ranged from not fussed to hate. That's just one man's opinion.

    Personally, I was doing straight up Music there and I can't say I loved it for a number of reasons. Didn't stay past the first year. If you've got options outside of Northern Ireland, I'd say you should seriously consider those first.
  4. avatar MSB Mastering
    A student's POV is one thing, an employer's another. I'd seriously research how many students on these courses end up with jobs within the industry. Those records should be available - and if not, you've got to wonder why. I know I'm periodically surveyed on what I'm up to and how it relates to my studies.

    However, many students embark on a course irrespective of career prospects anyway. If it's something you wish to learn, then maybe the prospects won't matter to you.

    I'd also look into the completion ratio of the course.

    Best of luck whatever you decide.
  5. avatar papaul
    I hear nothing about bad things about it. A friend of mine who was on the course was saying that the equipment available to him was really basic, only the masters student got to use the flashy gear at SARC. Apparently he got naff all studio time, just mountains of theory and nowhere near enough hands-on practical kinda stuff.

    And of course there is the programming element to the course which very few people will be interested in, completely put me off it. My course tutor at tech was telling me that if I actually wanted to become a great recording engineer that uni wasn't really the way to go, she advised me to do the HND (which is quite hands-on), complete the protools training program, and get in with a good producer to learn on the job.

    I agree with her, theory will only take you so far in recording, practical experience will teach you a lot more.

    If you're dead set on going to uni, you should prolly look towards england.
  6. avatar adamb1026
    Graduating this year from the course. I could go on for days about it, as im sure the other students would as well.

    1. Yes we're pretty limited to what we can access.

    2. Master students do seem to get the best gear to use.

    3. You will not be in the studio every day learning how to record. You're pretty much left to your devices.

    4. Be open minded as to what you think music can or could be.

    5. At least have a good knowledge in computer programming.

    For a final year student there are THREE studios. Two are 'preferred' for first year students, even though they are 'undergraduate' based. And the other main studio is for 'recording final' students. They took one away to create a practise room for BSc Music students, even though they have 7.....


    Some days it was great, others not so much.

    Check out the course at the Button Factory in Dublin. You basically do the three years in one year. And you are in the studio, recording basically every day.
  7. avatar forevertwisted
    If you want to do straight up recording I would definately not recommend it. The modules which do focus on it (1 a year) are quite good but as adam said, its limited.

    If you want to write electroacoustic music, focus on the 'artier' aspects of music and create music using computer programming then this is the course for you.

    Personally I believe those students who did a HND, or the like, in music technology in a tech fared much better than those coming straight out of school.

    But the main point being, if you want to be an engineer this is not the best course for you (something which I wish i had listened to when deciding myself)
  8. avatar exitonline
    Well I graduated in this course and I have to say I enjoyed it and found that it armed me well for a career as a producer/engineer. I do have to say though, if you just go to the lectures, doing enough to get by and do no learning on your own expecting to get a great job in a studio your living in a dream world. The Music Tech course is primarily a theory based degree, you don't simply get to mess around with ProTools and fancy gear for 3 years. Right from the start of my degree I continued to work on building up my CV doing session work and working in studios such as Air Studios in London on a freelance basis. Since graduating I have got offered a few jobs in studios in London but I have decided to put a producing career on hold to work on a career as a musician. But on the advisement of several studios I have started doing the ProTools certification to get qualified as an operator. Another thing studios are asking for these days is people who know music theory to a high level. For example when I was in Air Studios the producer of the session was expected to follow the orchestral score.

    [quote:c96b496527="MSB Mastering"]A student's POV is one thing, an employer's another. I'd seriously research how many students on these courses end up with jobs within the industry. Those records should be available - and if not, you've got to wonder why.[/quote:c96b496527]
    Well since I graduated I've had nobody from the University directly get in in touch with me to ask what im doing and im sure others are in the same boat. Plus others take a few years out to do other things before chasing their dream job. So I wouldnt really judge anything by employment figures given by a university (most of them are doctored anyway to look attractive on paper). Also, as I said allot of people just coast along on this course to get a degree with no intention of working in the music industry.

    [quote:c96b496527="papaul"]I hear nothing about bad things about it. A friend of mine who was on the course was saying that the equipment available to him was really basic, only the masters student got to use the flashy gear at SARC. Apparently he got naff all studio time, just mountains of theory and nowhere near enough hands-on practical kinda stuff.[/quote:c96b496527]
    Maybe your right but you will find loads of people who claim to know how to record or call themselves a sound engineer but few of them will actually know the theory behind it. I went into this course primarily to learn the theory behind digital systems, acoustics and basically why things work. You can learn all the hands on stuff on your own either by using the allocated studio time or getting practical experience outside uni. Allot people complain about all the theory, computer programming and technical aspects of this course. But studios get applications from every fool under the sun who says they can record a band, but they wouldnt know the theory behind it.

    Overall, I would recommend this course, but only if your willing to learn truck loads of theory and do allot of work outside uni to learn your craft. But if you want to do straight up recording and not worry about the theory behind it I would look somewhere else.
  9. avatar legitmik
    University Of Ulster are doing a BA Creative Technologies. Just finished the first year. Nearly...

    Audio, video, internet, all yer modern media tech stuff.

    Tis good.
  10. avatar Scarboy
    [quote:52fb94cd18="adamb1026"]

    Check out the course at the Button Factory in Dublin. You basically do the three years in one year. And you are in the studio, recording basically every day.[/quote:52fb94cd18]

    Any chance of a link? :)
  11. avatar papaul
    [quote:c5b7599acc="Scarboy"][quote:c5b7599acc="adamb1026"]

    Check out the course at the Button Factory in Dublin. You basically do the three years in one year. And you are in the studio, recording basically every day.[/quote:c5b7599acc]

    Any chance of a link? :)[/quote:c5b7599acc]

    http://www.soundtraining.com/content.php?ID=1
  12. avatar Scarboy
    [quote:644b43203a="papaul"][quote:644b43203a="Scarboy"][quote:644b43203a="adamb1026"]

    Check out the course at the Button Factory in Dublin. You basically do the three years in one year. And you are in the studio, recording basically every day.[/quote:644b43203a]

    Any chance of a link? :)[/quote:644b43203a]

    http://www.soundtraining.com/content.php?ID=1[/quote:644b43203a]

    thanks :)
  13. avatar Jamie_IronMaiden
    I've applied for the queens course and have creative technologies at magee campus as my insurance. spose ill see ye come September if all goes to plan Reilly!
  14. avatar nocturn
    I graduated from the Music Technology at Queens last year, and found work straight away teaching ND/HND Music Technology at NWRC in Derry. Thought the Degree course made me pretty well equipped, but i did have to learn an awful lot of stuff myself outside of uni, wwhich was fine. Its honestly a great course, just expect to have to do some degree of Computer Programming, and not as much recording as you'd expect (not until your final year anyway).

    I spent practically my entire last year doing recording, but i had done a lot of recording work before this, so i found the final year a lot easier than some classmates who had no recording experience outside of the degree.

    Oh, and all the really nice gear is only for postgrad use. Sucks.
  15. avatar reilly
    Thanks for the input guys! Very helpful!

    A lot of the stuff said makes me doubt the course..but as i am only finishing A level, I have my heart set on the course and have had for the past 4 years! I'm willing to put the work in theory-wise and understand that I wont be recording every day!

    It's just a subject that I'm really interested in and want to know the ins and outs of each module!

    Plus it will help in the long run if I do decide to carry on another course afterwards in Protools/Creative engineering etc.

    But you're input is very much appreciated! Keep it coming!!
  16. avatar exitonline
    [quote:ddeb0b5a44="reilly"]

    It's just a subject that I'm really interested in and want to know the ins and outs of each module! [/quote:ddeb0b5a44]

    The course is constantly changing but when I done it I done modules in Digital Audio Systems, Analogue Audio Systems, Studio Techniques, Acoustics, Computer Programming, New Media, Composition and an extensive recording portfolio amongst others. Digital Audio Systems and Acoustics were very tough theory wise but well worth it. It helps to know the science behind sample rates, dither, jitter, oversampling and generally why digital systems work, allot of maths, physics and theory. Overall, I thought it was worth it because it really helps to know the science behind recording to get better results. Although, in saying all this there are people who manage to complete the degree just doing enough to get by and they wouldn't know how to setup a microphone. Believe me I did witness someone recording a singer using the wrong end/side of a microphone as part of their final year recording portfolio and wondering why they were getting a quiet and slightly reverberated sound. :lol:
  17. avatar crumlinpunx
    I did this course for about 6 months and hated it. I went in expecting there to be a lot of practical stuff but the closest I got to playing anything was a kind of experimental improvisation class once a week. Partly due to me not researching the course enough I imagine, but if you're looking to PLAY music as opposed to learn about the science behind it this isn't for you! There was a pretty good class about how to work a studio and set it up and record etc but again, only half an hour once a week.