1. avatar Sir Bob Gelding
    If I played my bass through my flatmate's sub on his surround system, for example would it damage his gear? Would it be a good idea at all?
  2. avatar wannabeflea
    Shouldn't do any harm if you take it easy. If it sounds like it's strugling then ease off. It'll probably sound like pants though!
  3. avatar nalo
    Erm, depends how your connecting it I think? Not sure it'd be a great idea to be honest, AV equipment is designed with the output from an AV amp in mind..
    Also, subwoofers are designed for lower frequencies than bass amps. Subwoofers typically go from 150kHz to ~20kHz, while bass guitars will generally range up to 10kHz, depending on certain factors. Cut out the 'middle' and 'treble' on a hi-fi and you should notice a difference to the bass sound, proving this.

    Might be worth a go anyway if the gear isn't being used!
  4. avatar Sadoldgit
    There are impedance issues.

    You can play a bass or guitar quite easily through a hi-fi indirectly if you are using one of the little Boss or Zoom reocrders.
    I suspect POD`s and the like are also the same, and a DI box would probably also be feasble to connect to the input.
    I wouldnt plug a bass or guitar in directly.
  5. avatar Rocky
    Plugging the Bass in directly will possibly work, it'll be quiet though.

    Using something like a recorder described above will improve this as you are amplifying instrument level (approx -30 to -20 Dbu) to line level (-10Dbu) which is the standard for consumer audio equipment.

    However using a DI box will make the matter worse, as you are reducing the level from instrument level to Mic level (approx -60 to -40 Dbu)
    A D.I. Box is designed to make instrument/line level
    match the levels of Microhone pre amplifiers on mixing consoles.

    Nalo's post about frequency are true at heart, but a little confused and confusing!
    I believe they are saying that a Subwoofer's frequency response (the freqs you will hear from it) are
    20 Hertz up to 150 Hertz.

    So by plugging into the sub alone you will only hear these low frequencies, which in effect means it won't sound very useful or pleasing if you expect it to sound like a
    bass amp. However slap a fuzz face in there and I'd probably pay 500 to use it!

    Some potentially interesting reading is here around page 19 regarding levels:


    [url]http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ByJG1iwUHBAC&pg=PA19&lpg=PA19&dq=difference+between+mic,+instrument+and+line+levels+chart&source=bl&ots=PkjuALzAEG&sig=xy18TGHkcBZ87AgDN8za8FXeflw&hl=en&ei=v6QZSsOXAY-sjAfRj6X6DA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1#PPA19,M1[/url]

    And HERE is an good visualization of the
    spectrum of human hearing in relation to all things musical, which is generally 20hz to 20khz. Though Nalo is hearing 150Khz!!!!!!!!!

    http://www.moultonlabs.com/gallery/image_full/130/
  6. avatar Jimmy Seagus
    [i:fd596af535]However using a DI box will make the matter worse, as you are reducing the level from instrument level to Mic level (approx -60 to -40 Dbu)[/i:fd596af535]

    Only if you use the pad control/s on the Direct Box,or the Box has designated Line,Speaker or Instrument inputs otherwise you're simply balancing an unbalanced input signal for reasons of impedance matching.
    A line level/ instrument signal will not automatically drop to mic level simply because it passes through a D.I.

    [i:fd596af535]A D.I. Box is designed to make instrument/line level
    match the levels of Microhone pre amplifiers on mixing consoles.[/i:fd596af535]

    A D.I. Box is designed to allow a better impedance match between the (usually) unbalanced instrument output and the mic. input balanced circuitry of a mixer channel, it has nothing to do with levels though as mentioned above a line level signal, or even an amplifier/speaker level signal can be padded at either end to allow safe routing into a balanced input channel and proper use of the channel pre amp.

    Thon Nalo's some pup if he can hear 150kHz. I'd be happy if I could hear above 14kHz. :lol: