1. avatar TalkShowMan
    Article from The Telegraph today, are we reaching saturation point with music?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturecritics/neilmccormick/5125923/Is-there-too-much-music.html

    A couple of interesting points on something I've been considering a lot recently. Very speculative, but thought y'all might like a read of it too.
  2. avatar fastfude
    There's always been more music then anyone could listen to in a lifetime - music has been part of our lives since the dawn of civilisation.

    The only major difference now is that it's much more accessible on a massive scale via the web.

    It might seem like we're being overwhelmed, but that just means you need to work out a better way of sifting and filtering for the bits you'll like most.
  3. avatar Orzo
    People access music in different ways. Just because there's more music available, doesn't mean people listen to more music or buy more cds/downloads etc. You would have to go out of your way to listen to more music and I doubt this is the case for the overwhelming majority.

    Also, with more music available, you have a wider choice of what you do buy/download/listen to and still avoid what you don't like. For example, just because there's more of a specific genre of music available, if I don't like it (i.e. Opera) I'm still going to ignore it.

    People will always pick and choose what they listen to regardless of the volume available.
  4. avatar TalkShowMan
    [quote:5b99c81830="fastfude"]There's always been more music then anyone could listen to in a lifetime - music has been part of our lives since the dawn of civilisation.

    The only major difference now is that it's much more accessible on a massive scale via the web.

    It might seem like we're being overwhelmed, but that just means you need to work out a better way of sifting and filtering for the bits you'll like most.[/quote:5b99c81830]

    Totally, I liked the point that the average 14 year old listener will hear more styles of music in a day than his grandfather may have heard in his entire lifetime, but that the actual amount of music listened to would be roughly the same.

    I came to the article thinking about how much music has been potentially devalued by the sheer amount of it out there on so many formats and mediums, and how hard it must be now for a band to break through with that sort of competition, but the article raised points I hadn't considered, such as the one above.
  5. avatar isis
    Music is another form of communication and expression. What's the answer to that issue if there was too much music? Cull the musicians? What a strange question. Maybe the question that article is asking is 'Is there too much escapism?'
  6. avatar jackryan
    I have had this discussion or a similar discussion alot.

    As a kid growing up you where bought a tape (i'm an 80's child and 90's teen) or you saved like blazes and bought a tape.

    You brought the tape home and you listened to side A, then B and then repeated the process over and over. You totally absorbed the album, every song from start to finish. Rewind and Fast Forward where a pain in the ass AND used up your walkmans battery so even the songs you didn't love so much where listened too.

    Now we download hundreds of songs to our hard-drive. We skip through them, we erase the ones we don't like, we listen to an album once and if it doesnt hit us first or second time it can easily be taken off the ipod and replaced quickly with another one.

    Why? well I don't think we have too much music I simply think the way it is made avaialable to us to buy, steal or listen to has changed.

    I have started putting one CD in the car and keeping it there for a couple of weeks. I drive for 1-2 hours per day so that has brought me back to really listening to albums.

    I used to listen to tapes until the print wore off the plastic - you can't do that with an MP3!
  7. avatar TalkShowMan
    [quote:7bc919c226="isis"]Music is another form of communication and expression. What's the answer to that issue if there was too much music? Cull the musicians? What a strange question. Maybe the question that article is asking is 'Is there too much escapism?'[/quote:7bc919c226]

    I don't think there is an answer, and I think that the article could just as easily be about the prevalence of anything concerned with the arts, in that we are surrounded by auditory and visual mediums 24/7 (with the exception of those who try and opt out, e.g., those who will not own a television).

    But the same counter arguments hold true here as well, in that there is probably no more or less "x" than before, it's just that it's A) more accessible and B) around us more in our daily lives.
  8. avatar TalkShowMan
    [quote:ba1f2499d2="jackryan"]I have had this discussion or a similar discussion alot....

    I have started putting one CD in the car and keeping it there for a couple of weeks. I drive for 1-2 hours per day so that has brought me back to really listening to albums.

    I used to listen to tapes until the print wore off the plastic - you can't do that with an MP3![/quote:ba1f2499d2]

    I know what you mean. I've reached the stage where if I want background music I'll stick on some MP3s, but if I actually want to listen something LPs win every time as I now associate this with experiencing the music...man.

    I too am a fan of the CD in the car for months on end strategy, only problem is my car CD player has snuffed it.
  9. avatar jackryan
    [quote:9b9f6b32de]I too am a fan of the CD in the car for months on end strategy, only problem is my car CD player has snuffed it.[/quote:9b9f6b32de]

    Oh no - Chris Moyles for you or worse still Jo "this band is the new Arctic Monkeys" Whiley!! Hell on Earth
  10. avatar JTM
    Surely this is just a journo having a moan because he had to wade through hundreds of CDs of average stuff.

    The answer isn't less music, it's better music.
  11. avatar T Entertainment
    Absolutely everyone in the world should be murdered at once, and absolutely every thing in the world should be set fire to at once. Always.
  12. avatar Steven Dedalus
    [quote:9ec997ba0e="T Entertainment"]Absolutely everyone in the world should be murdered at once, and absolutely every thing in the world should be set fire to at once. Always.[/quote:9ec997ba0e]

    I concur.

    It's the only way to be sure.
  13. avatar Recycled Alien
    [quote:7b927899f4="TalkShowMan"]http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturecritics/neilmccormick/5125923/Is-there-too-much-music.html[/quote:7b927899f4]Fat Old Bloke Can't Understand Modern Yoof! Stop the presses!
  14. avatar adamb1026
    [quote:8e5d559cba="jackryan"][quote:8e5d559cba]I too am a fan of the CD in the car for months on end strategy, only problem is my car CD player has snuffed it.[/quote:8e5d559cba]

    Oh no - Chris Moyles for you or worse still Jo "this band is the new Arctic Monkeys" Whiley!! Hell on Earth[/quote:8e5d559cba]

    lol then we end up with Edith, 'have you heard of this band called sigur ros? They are different and gorgeous' Bohman.


    What worries me, being an audiophile, is mp3 compression and no-one offering so far a high quality .aiff or flac download service.
  15. avatar mav_rick
    My first post!
    [quote:688c81ef33]The essential problem of the democratisation of music is that like all advances it brings positives and negatives. On the one hand it's fantastic that anyone and everyone can make - and more importantly, distribute - their own music now. On the other, the lack of any gatekeeper of 'quality control' (a role formerly played by the increasingly irrelevant record companies) means finding anything decent to care about becomes nigh on impossible as it's like finding a needle in a haystack. Inevitably it's those that shout loudest - the brash, the immediate, the novelty - that float to the surface. The sheer oversupply and consequent choice has cheapened the whole experience of listening to music as something to be cared for, cherished and generally explored gradually.

    This - along with the availability of MP3 players - also encourages greater listening churn. When was the last time you listened to a whole album all the way through? Too many people now can barely listen to an entire song before skipping to the next one!? [/quote:688c81ef33]

    Firstly I apologise for pasting in such a large whack of a quote, but this is one of the responses to the article on the telegraph site and I think this guy makes some good points. I too have often though of the advent of cheap-recording-for-everyone as a bit of a double edged sword in that it's a good thing to enable the masses, but also a bit of a bitch to sift through the mass of mediocrity to find the daimonds in the rough.

    Secondly, I agree that the easy availability of a huge amount of digital music and the listening habits that have come about because of that in some way cheapens our experience - and perhaps sometimes makes it less genuine...oui ou non? Anyways, leading on from that observation I'd like to coin a new phrase if I can be so arrogant...

    iTunes syndrome: [i:688c81ef33] a sufferer of this syndrome is probably under 30 years of age and has had their attention span eroded by the information age to the point where they are unable to listen to a song in it's entirety without skipping to the next. This phenomenon began with CD's and has since spiralled out of control[/i:688c81ef33]

    So, eventually to get around to answering the question of "is there too much music?" - I don't know if there is such a thing as [i:688c81ef33]too[/i:688c81ef33] much but it's got to the point where there is [i:688c81ef33]so[/i:688c81ef33] much that it could make even the most impassioned music lover begin to ask serious questions.

    And a question of my own related to this: does anyone think that it will ever become impossible to write a song/piece of music that hasn't already been written? And by that I mean: word for word/note for note/timbre for timbre/glitch for glitch - when every possible permutation has been used up? (and we're talking as many billion years as you can imagine into the future). I don't have a clue to be honest but thought it might be an interesting question. If I had to guess though I'd say - we won't be around long enough to witness that, thankfully.
  16. avatar tinpot anto
    The only time there's ever been too much music is in the bridge section of Superbad by James Brown.

    It's too fucking funky.

    TOO MUCH FUNK!!!
  17. avatar belfastcalling
    I don't understand how there could be "too much" of something that is neither good or bad. Music is music, it's important to almost everyone, and every band has fans somewere so I honestly don't see the point in this discussion. It's like discussing if water is too wet.
  18. avatar Steven Dedalus
    [quote:a114a8b815="belfastcalling"]It's like discussing if water is too wet.[/quote:a114a8b815]

    Which it is.

    Too wet for my liking, anyway...
  19. avatar belfastcalling
    [quote:010ad47730="Steven Dedalus"][quote:010ad47730="belfastcalling"]It's like discussing if water is too wet.[/quote:010ad47730]

    Which it is.

    Too wet for my liking, anyway...[/quote:010ad47730]

    :lol:
    That is all i have to say.
  20. avatar belezabaub
    I wonder was their ever such an argument when Gutenberg invented the printing press? Personally I'm kind of glad that record companies are being made redundant. I definately don't see them as "gatekeepers" or controllers of quality, as a previous poster described them. One needs only to turn on the music channels and see that record companies forgot about quality a long time ago.

    Most record companies aren't concerned with quality but are more concerned with marketability. The human race has probably missed out on some of the greatest music simply because someone has decided it would be impossible to promote or uneconomical to produce.
  21. avatar whipchorus
    Was that after the first Police Academy, or Three Men and a Little Lady?
  22. avatar whipchorus
    Anyway

    I hate music, it's got too MANY NOTES.
  23. avatar belfastcalling
    [quote:000bdfe01f="whipchorus"]Anyway

    I hate music, it's got too MANY NOTES.[/quote:000bdfe01f]

    is that an Amadeus quote?
  24. avatar TalkShowMan
    [quote:ad488d3a5f="belfastcalling"]I don't understand how there could be "too much" of something that is neither good or bad. Music is music, it's important to almost everyone, and every band has fans somewere so I honestly don't see the point in this discussion. It's like discussing if water is too wet.[/quote:ad488d3a5f]

    Fair do's if you don't see the point in this discussion, but I think there are a couple of nuggets of thought worth considering....maybe. Or not.

    Beelzabaub mentions the Guttenburg press, and the possibility of arguments and controversy when it was invented (which, of course, there were). Now you can make allusions to our current situation, but the way I see it is that you can be surrounded by music all the live-long-day in a way you can't with literature (the medium of the presses).

    Again, if you want to draw comparisons with the amount of literature were subjected to in the forms of advertising and what-not fire away, I have considered that, but somehow I feel that literature, even when in the background, requires a form of active participation in a way that music may not.

    One last point in my rambling discourse. My car stereo has now officially died. No music. Nada. I kind of like the imposed silence when I'm driving, because I'm surrounded by music the rest of the time. Part of this is due to the work I do, part due to personal choice, and part due to music coming from sources I can't control (not voices in my head or anything). Having a space in which I know I'll hear NO music kind of makes me appreciate it a little bit more when I come back to it. Is that mental?
  25. avatar mav_rick
    [quote:ae9b72327d] I kind of like the imposed silence when I'm driving[/quote:ae9b72327d]

    Christ TalkShowMan you and I are totally opposite on that score - when I'm driving is one of the times I can't stand being without music - when I turn the music off I actually hear gear changes and all kindsa scary stuff I'm not used to! ha ha

    And I've also become worryingly dependent on music to fall asleep which means I'm pretty fucked if someone decides there is too much music and to get rid of it all somehow!

    It's not mental to enjoy silence from time to time though
  26. avatar The Ronster
    Possibly some day the Utopia (in my head at least) will come to pass:

    Music will become such a devalued commodity that record companies will cease to exist. Artists will no longer be able to make vast amounts of cash from music, and so we will see the death of the 'rock star'. Radio will be strictly talk only, so everyone has to find out about bands/artists on their own steam.

    Music will become a hobby that makes a wee bit of cash, no-one is a celebrity and all gigs are in small venues that close at around 11.30.

    And that, boys and girls, is my idea of heaven.
  27. avatar The Natural
    Rory's mention of literature and active paricipation is a good point.
    The advent of MP3 and earlier mobile systems means that all too often music has become something you listen to while doing something else. With vinyl people had to make the time to sit and listen to a static system in exactly the same way that they'd read a book, and that active participation meant that there was a greater involvement with the music that lasted much longer.
    What does devalue the music is the effusive fawning over every mediocre collection of haircuts capable of sticking two chords together or cutting and pasting a four bar section ad nauseam in protools or whatever.
    Usually by the people who should know better.
    Getting through this blizzard of inconsequential fluff that fills the airwaves takes too much time and energy, and impedes the chances of getting to hear the people who actually do have something listenable or important to say.
  28. avatar PaulATL
    but why stop there Ron? Why not take away the speech element of radio also, and all media so that nobody can share any information with each other at all, and we all live separately in wifi bubbles attached to a drip? sounds prittay, prittay cool eh? ;)
  29. avatar whipchorus
    The only thing worse than the 2009 blueprint of a 'rock star' is the lack of the 'rock star'. Anything's better than some earnest cunts talking about veganism or injustice in Bhutan.
  30. avatar tim_rooney
    "[i:c6d23f7441]I know that the twelve notes in each octave and the variety of rhythm offer me opportunities that all of human genius will never exhaust.[/i:c6d23f7441]"
    Igor Stravinsky
  31. avatar whipchorus
    [quote:34a7e20f6f="belfastcalling"][quote:34a7e20f6f="whipchorus"]Anyway

    I hate music, it's got too MANY NOTES.[/quote:34a7e20f6f]

    is that an Amadeus quote?[/quote:34a7e20f6f]

    THE REPLACEMENTS!!
  32. avatar mattagnew
    sorry to be geeky, but i find it hard to agree with his consumption figures. i know its a year old, but even still it's nearly impossible to measure music consumption correctly, would they be counting every advert that is on tv, every song played in a computer game or tv show. if they ask the average teenager about how much music they'd listen to, i'd put any money they'd just mention how much they listen to their ipod or on their computer. anyways i'd like to see where and how they got them results.
  33. avatar massimo
    I don't think having access to more music cheapens it. It should've been that way from the start. The biggest benefit of downloading music is that you can access as much as you want, whenever you want. It's not about getting it for free, it's the fact that I can grab whatever was number 1 in March 1992 if I want to, with a few clicks.

    Doesn't seem like there's any good reason to go back to where the only music available to you is what's offered by the companies that are trying to make as much cash as posssible off of you..