1. avatar fastfude
    http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/music/features/article2338393.ece

    Is there a similar archive over here?

    [quote:a236c10c04]Every year, the American Library of Congress chooses 25 of the most significant audio works to be preserved for posterity in a national archive. The latest selections are remarkable for their eclecticism.

    Uncle Josh and the Insurance Agent, by Cal Stewart (1904)

    Il mio tesoro, by John McCormack, orchestra conducted by Walter Rogers (1916)

    National Defence Test (12 September 1924)

    Black Bottom Stomp, by Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers (1926)

    Wildwood Flower, by The Carter Family (1928)

    Pony Blues, by Charley Patton (1929)

    You're the Top, by Cole Porter (1934)

    The Osage Bank Robbery, Episode of The Lone Ranger (17 December 1937)

    Address to Congress, by Franklin Delano Roosevelt (8 December 1941)

    Native Brazilian Music, Recorded under the supervision of Leopold Stokowski (1942)

    Peace in the Valley, by Red Foley and the Sunshine Boys (1951)

    Chopin Polonaise Op 40, No 1, performed by Artur Rubinstein (1952)

    Blue Suede Shoes, by Carl Perkins (1955)

    Interviews with Billy Bell, by Edward D Ives (1956)

    Howl, by Allen Ginsberg (1959)

    The Button-down Mind of Bob Newhart Bob Newhart (1960)

    Be My Baby, The Ronettes (1963)

    We Shall Overcome, Recorded at a Carnegie Hall concert by Pete Seeger (1963)

    (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction, by The Rolling Stones (1965)

    A Change is Gonna Come, by Sam Cooke (1965)

    Velvet Underground and Nico, by the Velvet Underground (1967)

    The 86 Years of Eubie Blake, by Eubie Blake (1969)

    Burnin', by The Wailers (1973)

    Live in Japan, by Sarah Vaughan (1973)

    Graceland Paul Simon (1986)[/quote:a236c10c04]
  2. avatar rentaghost
    Not unless the British Library do it, but has their funding not been cut recently.

    The library of congress is hyuuuuge, and really quite lovely.
    I think they store a copy of each first edition of every book published in the US by American authors as well as the music thing.
  3. avatar Meerium
    [quote:ca3e30a001="fastfude"]http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/music/features/article2338393.ece

    Is there a similar archive over here?[/quote:ca3e30a001]

    that'll be the national sound archive at the british library http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/cat.html

    the popular music curator is a top bloke called andy linehan who looks vaguely like sean hughes, and is a good person to sit beside in a boring conference, cause you play games of 'academic author bingo'.

    [i:ca3e30a001]edited because i called him an archivist first, and he's a curator[/i:ca3e30a001]
  4. avatar Pete
    Interestingly (if you're an audio nerd) the American Library of Congress where possible prefers to have their long term storage copies of audio recordings on vinyl. If left untouched vinyl remains perfectly intact where as magnetic recording formats and CDs degrade over time due to corrosion. They also argue that the mechanical method of reading a recording off vinyl will be easily reproduced at any stage in the future whilst digital formats come and go.


    They still keep digital copies of everything, for day to day access and listening. They may even have moved to mp3s for public use in their "reading" rooms by now (the article I read on this was a few years ago).
  5. avatar Speed Demon
    [quote:7c1e57fb89="Pete"]If left untouched vinyl remains perfectly intact[/quote:7c1e57fb89]For how long? Better to cut the disks in platinum or something.

    Anyway, the whole notion of digital formats becoming unreadable is irrelevant. You just copy the old to the new every so often.
  6. avatar Pete
    How long? According to the article, indefinitely. It doesn't corrode. And it's a bit cheaper than platinum!

    There is always the risk of screwing up during digital transfer, It's good to have a solid physical backup.
  7. avatar my-angel-rocks
    My friend had a theory that the higher up the DJ chain you got the cooler the records you had access to. Then he read an article about DJ Shadow being given the run of the National Sound Archive and discovered that his theory was true.