1. avatar T Entertainment
    Is Threads the most traumatising thing ever shown on television?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threads

    [quote:e0cfb4703d]Threads is a 1984 BBC television docudrama depicting the effects of a nuclear war on the United Kingdom and its aftermath. Written by Barry Hines and directed by Mick Jackson, Threads was filmed in late 1983 and early 1984. The premise of Threads was to hypothesize the effects of a nuclear war on the United Kingdom after an exchange between the Soviet Union and the United States escalates to include the UK.[/quote:e0cfb4703d]

    And here it is, in its entirety!
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2023790698427111488

    Eamonn Ev? Feline?
  2. avatar feline1
    I should bleedin' say so, it makes Shindler's List look like an advert for cheap holidays in other people's misery, or sthg.

    I only just saw this BBC post-nucelar-armageddon-mockumentary-teledrama from 1984 for the first time this weekend (wow, only 23 years late - Get In, Feline1, or sthg!) - for those of ewe who don't know, it's largely set in Sheffield, showing a deeply implausible situation of military build-up and conflict in Iran, which escalate into nuclear strikes, with several hundred megatons falling on Britain.

    It's very fcking "hard hitting" in its unremitting portrayal of just how fücked we'd all be.... particularly the way everyone is just suggested as descending into a race of grunting neanderthal loons who can't barely string two words together beyond "Gissus that!" and "Oi! Ewe! STOP!"
    But then again, one can hardly accuse it of being melodramatic propaganda, as it was all pretty well-researched straightforward stuff. I mean they even asked Carl Sagan!

    I can't help but contrast it with my other favourite post-apocalytic BBC fiction series, Terry Nation's "SURVIVORS", where the population of Britain is reduced to about 100,000 by a leaked germ-warefarm virus... that show, despite being fairly "grim", basically presents lots of middle-class people attempting to do "Extreme Good Life" down on a farm in Hereford...it's almost rather flattering to ones imagination, letting the viewer think "oh! if I was one of the few survivors, I might actually bally well be able to make a good stab at this!" -
    .....but in Threads, there's none of this agricultural optimism, as nuclear winter reduces Britain to near-tundra conditions, kill most of the plants and leaving 4 million scrabbling mongs rooting around in the rubble.

    I honestly couldn't sleep after watching it :O I think the worst scene for me was of a hospital turned into a charnel house..... imagine the "blind loons trapped in a stairwell" scene from the BBC's Day of the Triffids, add in the filth of various bits of "Jacob's Ladder", make it about 10 million times worse, as someone gets their leg sawed off without anaesthetic and everyone just hysterically panics.

    More than anything else, I found myself struck my the utter lunacy of "mutually assured destruction" - Oh well - I guess it would harden us. And stop the spread of world Communism. Or sthg :cry:
  3. avatar T Entertainment
    You can see all of the 1965 forerunner The War Game here:
    http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=war+game
    in five bits. It's not quite as bad...but it's close.
  4. avatar Baronation
    It's my fav movie! No kidding.
  5. avatar greensleevesisgod
    They made us watch this in GCSE History, I was up for weeks crying. I mean, I had always heard about the fashion in the 80's but that was horrible...

    The end really freaked me out, I can see reflections of it in todays Belfast.
  6. avatar feline1
    No time for babbies comin' here!
    Ewe'll just have to go home and use your common sense :?
  7. avatar rentaghost
    I dunno. I think, given that I was five years old when watching it, and that it was supposed to be a kids programme, that The Changes comes pretty close.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/cult/classic/changes/intro.shtml
  8. avatar feline1
    I saw a pirate screening of The Changes at a cinema club in Brighton a few years ago, it is ahiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiine!

    I wish they'd release it on DVD.
    I emailed the BBC to ask, but they just told me I'd have to "write to 2|Entertain". On paper! Tsk! Like I have time for that! :-/
  9. avatar rentaghost
    it gave me nightmares for years.
  10. avatar T Entertainment
    I was [i:6a6f73d181]11[/i:6a6f73d181] when I saw Threads. I mean, Jesus! :shock:
    Changes looks class.
  11. avatar feline1
    It is bizarre..... compared to modern TV, the pace of the thing is so slow, it's like it's on drugs .... I know that when I was about 5, and some half-hour serial that I barely understood was on once a week for an entire 13 weeks, and there were no video recorders, and you'd inevitably miss half of them cos you had to go to your grannies or sthg that day, and you could barely remember the start,
    each episode you did catch would just be like wallowing in some bizarre half-understood epic myth.

    The theme tune was radiophonic werkshop madness! with freizeframe trains
  12. avatar Baelmammon
    I remember this I was 6 maddness I actually thought that I'd dreamt seeing that programme. See no CGI and it still looks great.
  13. avatar rentaghost
    I'm still wary of electricity pylons. I'm convinced that The Changes is partially responsible for the populist anti- mobile phone mast movement in South Down
  14. avatar feline1
    The field around a pylon is quite benign compared to those bloody mobile phone and TETRA masts - I walked underneathe one yesterday, I felt nauseous for the rest of the day. :oops:
  15. avatar nonlogic liam
    threads rocks. enough said.
  16. avatar tenrabbits
    [quote:983a853567="feline1"]The field around a pylon is quite benign compared to those bloody mobile phone and TETRA masts[/quote:983a853567]

    Or the sun on a bright day.
  17. avatar T Entertainment
    Liam, only someone with your bleak worldview would say 'Threads rocks'.
    It's unbelievably horrifying.
    I said to Feline, I only spotted on my last watch that at the end when the girl is stumbling about ready to give birth to that blob of flesh, she goes past HANGING BODIES with very much the implication they are to be eaten. Christ.
  18. avatar gl2200
    Threads. Scum. Made In Britain.

    The UK did teen movies a tad differently to our American brethren.
  19. avatar gl2200
    [quote:c5778e1dfd="T Entertainment"]I said to Feline, I only spotted on my last watch that at the end when the girl is stumbling about ready to give birth to that blob of flesh, she goes past HANGING BODIES with very much the implication they are to be eaten. Christ.[/quote:c5778e1dfd]

    Aye, yes but when is screaming in agony about to drop the sprog we see that agriculture, infrastructure and government might have collapsed, but judging by her copious fillings the dental service continues unabated.
  20. avatar dirty stevie smitty
    Threads is no 'The Battle for Algeris'.
  21. avatar feline1
    [quote:ded30ee964="tenrabbits"][quote:ded30ee964="feline1"]The field around a pylon is quite benign compared to those bloody mobile phone and TETRA masts[/quote:ded30ee964]

    Or the sun on a bright day.[/quote:ded30ee964]

    I don't know who taught ewe physics, boyo! That's rubbish. The Sun's magnetic and electric fields don't reach us directly, as their Earth's own ones press back against them ... look up magnetoshphere on wikipedia.
    The only place you're gonna get that sort of thing on your head is if you stay on Baffin Island with an aurora borealis birkeland current flux tube on your head.
  22. avatar Speed Demon
    [quote:08300a1f2e="feline1"]The field around a pylon is quite benign compared to those bloody mobile phone and TETRA masts - I walked underneathe one yesterday, I felt nauseous for the rest of the day. :oops:[/quote:08300a1f2e]I think you're confusing electric fields with electromagnetic radiation, for flux sake.
  23. avatar tenrabbits
    [quote:b3fe81442e="feline1"]I don't know who taught ewe physics, boyo! That's rubbish. The Sun's magnetic and electric fields don't reach us directly, as their Earth's own ones press back against them ... look up magnetoshphere on wikipedia.
    The only place you're gonna get that sort of thing on your head is if you stay on Baffin Island with an aurora borealis birkeland current flux tube on your head.[/quote:b3fe81442e]

    The sun has a great effect on electromagnetic flux at sea level. I don't believe I said it was the sun's own fields we're bathed in, although a hell of a lot of solar radiation bathes us daily. Like sunlight. Hence the name. As you've mentioned the sun's [i]electromagnetic[/] effects specifically, well our own magnetic field reacts to the sun (aurora borealis being an example) and this is why you can hear interference on (again, for example) a radio on high solar activity days. At ground level solar electromagnetic effects include creating currents on the ground to the extent that power grids have fairly extensive systems to deal with it.

    Having studied transmitters quite closely, the 'health risks' presented by them are largely based on hearsay and misunderstanding of radiation. As far as I'm aware, none of the major studies have shown any health problems caused by them, and they've been around twenty years now.

    Pylons are an interesting one as (from what I remember) there's been some links with ELF and leukaemia in kids. Do you take the tube though feline? You're riding along in a carriage powered by a giant dc series motor, which by its very nature radiates on the EM spectrum massively.

    I'm probably over answering here, but it's a topic that interests me.
  24. avatar Tele
    This is the scariest film I have ever seen and I'm always trying to get other people to watch it - it is the most accurate portrayal of post-Apocalyptic civilization that has ever been produced.

    The American version, "The Day After" is truly optimistic by comparison.
  25. avatar Cugel
    [quote:54ae52450e="Tele"]it is the most accurate portrayal of post-Apocalyptic civilization that has ever been produced.[/quote:54ae52450e]
    How do you know?
  26. avatar Tele
    I thought the same thing just after typing it actually!

    The list of Doctors, including Carl Sagan (inventor of the Nuclear Winter theory), is quite extensive which leads me to believe that it's as real a depiction as could be produced without actually having a full-scale nuclear exchange.
  27. avatar Eamonn Evangelists
    I watched Threads again today with a hangover. It's no cure, I assure thee.
    It should be aired on BBC1 again to scare the bejaysus out of another generation.
  28. avatar T Entertainment
    Oh, another class bit - when the heavily pregnant Ruth clearly has to whore herself to one of the mongers in exchange for the frozen rats he is selling as meals for one.
    And the woman sitting there with one eye nursing her charred baby. And the dog eating Ruth's grandmother's corpse. And the summary executuions of the looters with the brains on the wall. And the bit where Jeff and Ruth desperately drink the blood from the dead sheep. Oh and when the horrifically burnt woman has to scrabble though the rubble after seeing her son's foot sticking out. Not to mention the old man with his legs blown off and the cat which kinda melts so that it looks like a burning ET doll. And everyone goes blind from ultra violet light and gets cancer and it's like whaaaaaaaa?!
  29. avatar Wd-adam
    [quote:806e12e40e="T Entertainment"]Oh, another class bit - when the heavily pregnant Ruth clearly has to whore herself to one of the mongers in exchange for the frozen rats he is selling as meals for one.
    And the woman sitting there with one eye nursing her charred baby. And the dog eating Ruth's grandmother's corpse. And the summary executuions of the looters with the brains on the wall. And the bit where Jeff and Ruth desperately drink the blood from the dead sheep. Oh and when the horrifically burnt woman has to scrabble though the rubble after seeing her son's foot sticking out. Not to mention the old man with his legs blown off and the cat which kinda melts so that it looks like a burning ET doll. And everyone goes blind from ultra violet light and gets cancer and it's like whaaaaaaaa?![/quote:806e12e40e]

    Yea, I'm going to wait for daylight before I watch this.
  30. avatar RAAP Management
    When you recover (and it does really require recovery), you actually appreciate non irradiated life a bit more.
    DO watch it though. That's the whole hour and a half on the google vid link in the first post.

    One other good bit - about an hour after the blast the announcer intones: "at this stage, the symptoms of radiation sickness, and the symptoms of panic, are identical", then cuts to shots of everyone vomiting, sh*tting themselves and either shrieking hysterically or nodding catatonically.
  31. avatar I'mDead
    I couldn't get past that big fat erotic spider at the start. Those things give me the willies.
  32. avatar chrisjedijane
    the big spider freaked me out too.
  33. avatar Pete
    Well that was excellent.

    I doubt very much something like that could be made today, not without having the script ammended to include a squad of US Marines saving the days whilst shouting "HOO-YAH!" anyway.

    The speed with which any form of government or administration fell apart was shocking.

    That bloke in the pub at the start of it has is right, if the bomb is going to go off I want to be directly under it pissed out of my head!
  34. avatar feline1
    [quote:5448da77dc="tenrabbits"]Having studied transmitters quite closely, the 'health risks' presented by them are largely based on hearsay and misunderstanding of radiation. As far as I'm aware, none of the major studies have shown any health problems caused by them, and they've been around twenty years now.[/quote:5448da77dc]

    Oh come now.
    Most of these brainwrong studies have been farcically egregious in the vested interest antics.

    Basic physics, chemistry and biology knowledge tells you that there HAS to be health risks from these things, from first principles.
    The correct methodology is therefore to demonstrate a biological mechanism whereby these textbook risks could be counteracted by the body, rather than the other way round.

    I mean, for instance, most of these studies about pylons conclude there's no risk because they measure the Ohmic heating effect from the field on a body cell, due to the induced current :lol: :lol: "Yes well so you see, the cell is only heated by 0.1oC so therefore it must be safe" :lol: :roll:

    However, any spa or spo knows of such textbook things as
    the Stark Effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stark_effect
    (perturbation of molecular energy levels by an E field)
    and of the Zeeman effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeeman_effect (splitting by a B field)
    and that chemical reactions occur when molecules collide and orbital of the correct energies merge and shimmer to form new bonds... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transition_state
    We also know that in biological cells, enzymes accelerate reaction rates by factors of thousands, millions or more
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enzymes
    In the broadest sense, they achieve this by bulk steric effects which subtletly perturb the molecular energy levels in reaction transition states, sometimes even managing to make preposterously unfeasible 3-body reactions occur.

    We also know that basically all active transport processes within cells are achieved by electrochemical gradients and ion transporation/osmosis in electrolytes, working on quite low potentials (a few hundred millivolts)

    The question is not "would external E and M fields not perturb the workings of biolgical cells?!?" but rather
    "HOW THE BLEEDIN' FECK TO WE NOT JUST ALL FALL OVER AND DIE WHEN WE TURN ON THE TELLY!?"

    Anyways, when I stand under a mobile mast, I feel ill, just like in The Changes. So there. This is empirical fact :P
  35. avatar tenrabbits
    [quote:9d3cbb3f99="feline1"][Most of these brainwrong studies have been farcically egregious in the vested interest antics.[/quote:9d3cbb3f99]

    I'm quite sure SOME of them have - but even those paid for by anti-mast groups have found no health risks from them.

    [quote:9d3cbb3f99="feline1"]Basic physics, chemistry and biology knowledge tells you that there HAS to be health risks from these things, from first principles. [/quote:9d3cbb3f99]

    What? That's just a lie. EM radiation is not ionising therefore I'd love to see you argue that "basic" physics, chemistry and biology tells us there has to be a risk. This is just plain wrong feline! Stop making sh[b:9d3cbb3f99][/b:9d3cbb3f99]it up!

    [quote:9d3cbb3f99="feline1"]The correct methodology is therefore to demonstrate a biological mechanism whereby these textbook risks could be counteracted by the body, rather than the other way round.
    I mean, for instance, most of these studies about pylons conclude there's no risk because they measure the Ohmic heating effect from the field on a body cell, due to the induced current :lol: :lol: "Yes well so you see, the cell is only heated by 0.1oC so therefore it must be safe" :lol: :roll: [/quote:9d3cbb3f99]

    There have been plenty of studies done which are not as daftly simplistic as that feline.. I mean.. Norway had a [i:9d3cbb3f99]national[/i:9d3cbb3f99] fecking study on the effects which ran for years!

    As for all the googlectual stuff you've whacked on the end of your post.. well I tend to follow the conclusions made by long term studies into the effects rather than some wiki-ed terms which may imply an effect.

    [quote:9d3cbb3f99]Anyways, when I stand under a mobile mast, I feel ill, just like in The Changes. So there. This is empirical fact :P[/quote:9d3cbb3f99]

    That is fair enough.. I'm quite certain there are quite a few people like yourself who are more sensitive to them, which is also one of the reasons why so many studies have been done - because surely if people fell funny standing near them they're bad for you right? Well.. none have found any health risks, and I feel nauseous standing next to many norn iron politicians, but that doesn't mean they're bad for my health.

    Unless I ate one of the fat bast[b:9d3cbb3f99][/b:9d3cbb3f99]ards..
  36. avatar feline1
    [quote:787d36a14e="tenrabbits"] EM radiation is not ionising therefore I'd love to see you argue that "basic" physics, chemistry and biology tells us there has to be a risk. [/quote:787d36a14e]

    Well thanks for demonstrating beautifully the kinda boneheaded blinkered non-joined-up-thinking "wha? but that wasn't on my syllabus! I did GCSE Double Science, not post-graduate molecular reaction dynamics and inorganic bioelectrochmeistry! :oops:" approach to the subject, tenrabbits.

    "EM radiation is not ionising therefore it can't pose a risk to health" - er, who said the mechanism for damage would involve ionizing?

    Are you deliberately being a mentalist? Has your brain been addled by a Tetra mast?

    I gave some handy wikipedia links so non-specialists might have SOME vague chance of following the discussion, not to imply I was a mong. Clearly though, even EWE, despite your professed interest, can't follow the discussion. And may even be a mong! GET IN!

    The prime suspects for harmful effects would be the effects of EM fields on enzyme-reaction transition states. Not least exciting ones involving RNA and DNA.
    No doubt someone like Anto can come along and tell us soon that all this wasn't on his syllabus either, and thus probably only affects Protestants.

    Yeo!
  37. avatar tenrabbits
    [quote:fca1e906a9="tenrabbits"]What? That's just a lie. EM radiation is not ionising therefore I'd love to see you argue that "basic" physics, chemistry and biology tells us there has to be a risk.[/quote:fca1e906a9]

    By this I obviously mean the EM RF used in phones/antennae before you google it feline.
  38. avatar tenrabbits
    Double post!
    Last edited on , 1 times in total.
  39. avatar feline1
    Yes but what the feck does it matter if it's ionising or not?

    You might as well say "Well, cars don't move at relativistic speeds therefore no gamma rays are given off by motorways, therefore playing on the M2 could not possibly harm your health", shortly before getting flattened by a c*nt in a BMW.
  40. avatar rentaghost
    I love it when we have rows about physics.
    A fairly traded chocolate bar to the person who turns this round into a row about philosophy
  41. avatar tenrabbits
    [quote:fdcd77fcc4="feline1"][quote:fdcd77fcc4="tenrabbits"] EM radiation is not ionising therefore I'd love to see you argue that "basic" physics, chemistry and biology tells us there has to be a risk. [/quote:fdcd77fcc4]

    Well thanks for demonstrating beautifully the kinda boneheaded blinkered non-joined-up-thinking "wha? but that wasn't on my syllabus! I did GCSE Double Science, not post-graduate molecular reaction dynamics and inorganic bioelectrochmeistry! :oops:" approach to the subject, tenrabbits. [/quote:fdcd77fcc4]

    Aye.. I took the approach that all the reports done by professional bodies/safety groups/medical research groups/whole bleeding countries over many years had probably more knowledge of those bioelectrochemical effects you mention, than some random internet troll whose self-importance exceeds even the aforementioned norn iron politicians I dislike.
  42. avatar feline1
    I already *am* castigating his epistemology, you hallyon!

    He hasn't given me any bloody physics yet, he just said "look I'm not paying any attention to all that physics you linked to and using it to reason out some conclusions! I'm just going to believe these here reports that were published, cos, like, well, otherwise, if those reports were wrong, well, good grief, think of the hoo-hah there'd be, damaging everyone's health like that! I mean even the Norwegians did a report! So it must be right!"
  43. avatar feline1
    [quote:78a887ab9c="tenrabbits"]
    Aye.. I took the approach that all the reports done by professional bodies/safety groups/medical research groups/whole bleeding countries over many years had probably more knowledge of those bioelectrochemical effects you mention, than some random internet troll whose self-importance exceeds even the aforementioned norn iron politicians I dislike.[/quote:78a887ab9c]

    Governments aren't going to publish papers saying that their national infrastructure which they've allowed and let people live under is actually giving everyone cancer. Go watch Yes Minister already.

    Power companies and phone companies aren't going to publish reports saying that anymore than George Bush's agripetroconglomerates will be publishing papers about global warming.

    And Norway's not even a proper country anyways, they just ran away from Sweden.
  44. avatar Tele
    I think this shows that some people can never admit that they're wrong. I love to be wrong.
  45. avatar Dirty Stevie Grizz
    well that was pretty grim. though i'd like to see it on proper telly as i could hardly make out what i was supposed to be looking at most of the time.

    though i doubt the BBC will show it again, as it doesn't have celebrities mincing about in spangly suits.
  46. avatar T Entertainment
    These days it would all be LITTLE BROTHER'S I'M AN IRRADIATED CELEBRITY MONGBEAST WITH NO SKIN WHOSE LOST ALL VOCABULARY AND ACQUIRED SOME PLEASING CATATACTS, with a prize of some frozen rats, cancer and the chance to give birth to a lump of molten flesh.
    But hang on - isn't that the commissioning brief for Celebrity Come Dancing? ' :wink: '
  47. avatar Dirty Stevie Grizz
    Foraging For Rotting Human Flesh On Ice?
  48. avatar Eamonn Evangelists
    Christopher Lindsay In Ice would be a programme I'd regularly tune in to.
  49. avatar Bobphoenix
    Just watched threads after reading this post. Fantastic show.

    What's quite interesting is at exactly 49 mins and 34secs into the movie, during the burning objects montage, we can clearly see ET being fried up. What's that all about?
  50. avatar feline1
    It's about stopping International Communism, dude.
  51. avatar RAAP Management
    "we can clearly see ET being fried up"

    Child's toy, innit.
    'CATATACTS' is my favourite ever typo.

    Seriously, if you like Threads watch The War Game. It was banned and sh*t for 20 years. I've posted the google video link on the first page, here's the youtube link (it's in 5 parts - the sound is a bit out of synch in the first one but fine in the rest).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxKkLsYICYY
  52. avatar T Entertainment
    Here, for anyone who enjoyed Threads or The War Game, I must recommend Cormac McCarthy's novel The Road, which is absolutely outstanding and also takes the oh-shit-absolutely-EVERYTHING-is-gone-and-we-are-all-going-to-eat-each-other perspective on nyukileer war.

    [img:267d2f4992]http://www.theage.com.au/ffximage/2006/12/15/road_narrowweb__300x485,0.jpg[/img:267d2f4992]
  53. avatar kingmob
    Yes, but No Country for Old Men is the far better McCarthy novel.

    Saying that, I read The Road in one sitting. It was on a trans-Atlantic flight and the inflight movies were shít, but it wouldn't have mattered if they were decent. That book is incredible.
  54. avatar Steven Dedalus
    You know, I enjoyed "The Road", but I really didn't think it was that good.

    The whole thing could have been cut in half and we wouldn't have missed too much from the plot.

    [u:d23c0eae0b]Son[/u:d23c0eae0b]: What's that in the distance?

    [u:d23c0eae0b]Father[/u:d23c0eae0b]: An old farmhouse.

    [u:d23c0eae0b]Son[/u:d23c0eae0b]: Shall we investigate and look for food?
    [u:d23c0eae0b]
    Father[/u:d23c0eae0b]: Yes.


    [i:d23c0eae0b]They investigate the house, and find nothing. They then continue on their journey.[/i:d23c0eae0b]

    [b:d23c0eae0b]REPEAT OVER AND OVER AGAIN, TO LABOUR THE POINT THAT WHEN THE NUCLEAR WAR HAPPENS, THERE [u:d23c0eae0b]REALLY[/u:d23c0eae0b] WON'T BE ANYTHING LEFT.[/b:d23c0eae0b]
  55. avatar Stumblefish
    I watched Threads very late one night about 5 years ago, i think it was on the Sci-Fi channel or something like that. It was a week night and I had work the next day but I couldn't just leave it, I just sat there getting steadily more knackered and shit scared.

    Along the same lines I remember watching "When the wind blows" when I was wee, it was equally horrible viewing. Raymond Briggs having had enough of creating delighful Christmas fun instead decided to turn his hand at traumatising a whole generation of kids who expected something nice. More personal and tragic than threads. I remember being disappointed, it being a cartoon I expected it to be more fun but being pleased that it had made my sister cry (I was a vindictive little shit sometimes)
  56. avatar kingmob
    [quote:1f6a250a06="Steven Dedalus"]You know, I enjoyed "The Road", but I really didn't think it was that good.

    The whole thing could have been cut in half and we wouldn't have missed too much from the plot.[/quote:1f6a250a06]

    NEXT WEEK ON FASTFUDE: THE CLASSICS, REVISITED.

    [img:1f6a250a06]http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/h0/h1938.jpg[/img:1f6a250a06]
    [i:1f6a250a06]
    Nothing happens. Twice. Yesterday[/i:1f6a250a06]
  57. avatar artofdarkness
    That rabies series from the early 80's - I think it was called The Mad Death - scared me as a child, I still remember in detail the bit where the reporter got closed in with all the cats by the mad old lady.
  58. avatar barrypeak
    No country... is number 10 in the top 10 Cormac McCarthy books.

    Top spot is taken by Blood Meridian.

    The Road is stunning but unlike anything else he has written.
  59. avatar Portadown News Editor
    There is an interesting aspect to all UK post-nuclear apocalypse fiction, including Threads and the War Game - the authors always invent some bizarre "limited strike" scenario, unlike the Americans who just go for the all-out East-West exchange.

    The reason, I think, is that the US is big enough for some places to escape immediate destruction in an all-out exchange - but the UK would just be fried to a cinder.
  60. avatar The enfant terrible
    I'm too lazy to rad everyone's posts thoroughly but did anyone mention Z for Zachariah, what a class book when you're about 10. maybe a bit balls reading it as an adult I dunno, Huckleberry Finn faired well on that front, Brer Rabbit did not.
  61. avatar T Entertainment
    Great BBC dramatization of that.

    Brother In The Land anyone?