1. avatar Sansie
    Someone put a nice hole in the back of my hohner acoustic guitar

    The guitar has a bit of sentimental value, so I thought i'd ask around to see if theres anywhere in northern ireland that would repair an acoustic for me at a reasonable price. The guitars barely worth £70 so Cheap and cheerful would be nice. i'd just wanna try and and get it back to some whole condition

    sansie2003@hotmail.com
  2. avatar chris1984_99_99
    Get a bit of balsa wood out of a model shop in town and take ur strings off, cut the balsa wood to size then use some wood glue and patch up the hole from the inside. to make it neater i would first cut around the hole, making it as neat as possible eg like a circle and when the patch is on from the inside i would fill it in with wood filler that closely matches the colour of the body, finish with a touch of varnish.

    tis just an idea, wouldnt be hard to do urself.
  3. avatar Speed Demon
    Balsa wood and filler would be about the worst things you could possibly choose to do this job.

    I'm not a luthier by any means, but I'm competent enough with wood. Since I'm a friend - nay, a devoted fan - I'd take a look for you, and if I thought I could do a reasonable job, I wouldn't charge anything.

    As long as you promise never to play [u:822aa44834]acoustic[/u:822aa44834] guitar with the band...
  4. avatar feline1
    won't this just be better anyways?
    It'll let more sound out and so be twice as loud! :-)
  5. avatar unplugged
    its not worth your while. I dont mean to be harsh face it the guitar is ball bagged and if its sentimental to you just hang it on your wall or something. it would cost £100+ to even do half of a job through a repair shop/person. Unfortunately by trying daft ideas such as balsa wood you could make more of a horlicks of it. Not advised.

    :(
  6. avatar chris1984_99_99
    the balsa wood was just an idea, only trying to help :-)

    surely a patch of something similar to the wood used in the contruction of the guitar on the inside would block off the hole, restoring the sound, and then its just a matter of cleaning it up on the exterior?

    i dont know, i dont work on these things, but it seems logical to me...
  7. avatar unplugged
    nobody is knocking the idea dude its just not really worth it in any way.
  8. avatar Mikeymoko
    try out the balsa wood idea- i just got myself some balsa wood handcrafted sticks.
  9. avatar fastfude
    Not that I know the first thing about guitar construction, but isn't the back panel of a guitar rather fundamental to the quality of the sound/resonance of the instrument?
    Clogging it up with balsa wood and filler would surely be the acoustic equivalent of repairing the broken windshield of a Ferrari with some cling film and gaffer tape. I'd have assumed either a whole new panel or a whole new guitar would be in order?
  10. avatar The Fires of Hell
    Yup.
  11. avatar unplugged
    [quote:695277d65a="fastfude"]Not that I know the first thing about guitar construction, but isn't the back panel of a guitar rather fundamental to the quality of the sound/resonance of the instrument?
    Clogging it up with balsa wood and filler would surely be the acoustic equivalent of repairing the broken windshield of a Ferrari with some cling film and gaffer tape. I'd have assumed either a whole new panel or a whole new guitar would be in order?[/quote:695277d65a]

    Yes, roger is spot on in what he is saying. Yes the back needs totally replaced so would the furling, binding and the bracing. Its really not worth it. Just cherish it and keep it safe as a memory dont make a botched job of it.
  12. avatar Speed Demon
    I think people are missing the point here. To pursue the previous analogy, what I'm hearing is a bunch of Ferrari drivers declaring that only a full engine rebuild will cure the problem.

    But what we have here is not a Ferrari, it's a Trabant. A basic repair will not destroy the tone or the value, because it has very little to begin with.

    A guitar of this quality will work as well as it ever will provided that the back and sides are intact and reasonably stiff, forming a resonant cavity that is driven by the sounding board of the front. In fact, I'd be surprised if it sounds detectably worse now with a hole in the back.
  13. avatar unplugged
    And indeed speed demon also has a point. sentimental yes but the guitar is a suitable for hammering fence posts in even from new. which leads back to it not being worth fixing. put it in the attic and sigh with memories in 20 years looking at it. even with the hole. :roll:
  14. avatar Join The Deaf Club
    You could take is an opportunity for experimentation and try plugging said hold with various household objects, perhaps a steel desert bowl or similar affixed over the hole by some means... in fact there's any amount of weirdness you could get up to with an already mutilated guitar that you probably wouldn't consider attempting if it involved an un-mutilated guitar - you could end up with a truly unique and bizarre sounding instrument.

    Suggestions that it's not worth repairing when you've stated it has sentimental value are possibly not helpful.
  15. avatar chris1984_99_99
    u would really need to put a pic up of the damaged part of the geetar. it could be a small perfectly round puncture hole, or it could have split and run the length of the body.
  16. avatar kinta1
    i dropped my martin onto a tiled floor 1 nit (ouuuch) and the back came away at 1 side. that was about 18months ago. after weighing up my options i went to my gigging tool kit and got the gaffa tape out. like brand new ! :-)
    adds character to it. also got a hole on the side.dont know how it happened. deciced to just leave it. no difference in the sound quality at all.

    ps any1 lend a guitar for next gig. swear ill look after it :-D